Focus on the Internet: Weather Underground’s Interactive Tornado Map

View recent tornado reports, current radar, photos and historically significant storms using Google Maps with Weather Underground’s Interactive Tornado Map. A great example of Web 2.0 technology in action.

Weather Underground’s Tornado FAQ is a very useful resource as well.

The Physical Environment textbook link: Tornadoes

Published in: on June 27, 2008 at 4:25 pm  Leave a Comment  
Tags: ,

Earth Online Media Blog

The Earth Online Media Blog is a companion to this site. It is dedicated to multimedia presentations related to topics discussed on the blog. Check out Earth Online Media.

Published in: on June 20, 2008 at 1:27 pm  Leave a Comment  

USGS Netvibes Universe

NetVibes is one of many personal web page sites, much like iGoogle. “Netvibes lets individuals assemble their favorite widgets, websites, blogs, email accounts, social networks, search engines, instant messengers, photos, videos, podcasts, and everything else they enjoy on the web – all in one place. “ A Netvibes “universe” is a special shared page created by an organization like the USGS or Greenpeace, or maybe a newspaper. Widgets in the USGS universe keep you up-to-date with the latest USGS news, recent earthquakes, volcano activity reports, map search, YouTube videos, and much more. You can add their widgets to your personalized NetVibe site too. You can also create a public page to share your digital digs.

Published in: on June 16, 2008 at 6:50 am  Comments (1)  

Focus on the Internet: Virtual Volcanology

The World Wide Web has become an exciting platform to share geoscience information with professional colleagues and the public.  In this Google Tech Talk from December 18, 2007 John E. Bailey, Alaska Volcano Observatory & Arctic Region Supercomputing Center, University of Alaska Fairbanks discuss his use of Google Earth to study volcanoes. Description from the site:

“Volcanoes are some of the most dynamic and visually spectacular natural features on the Earth’s surface. In Alaska, volcanoes are an intrinsic part of the landscape and culture, with over 70 volcanoes and volcanic fields that have been active in historic time. Monitoring of these volcanoes is undertaken by the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) using a suite of methods and tools in the fields of remote sensing, seismology, geodesy and geology that produce large volumes of geospatial data. The evolution in the capabilities of Google Earth and KML has provided a user-friendly interface and information-rich context in which these data can be displayed simultaneously and dynamically, offering new possibilities for communications with other scientists, emergency managers and the general public. I will present an overview of AVO’s operations, and demonstrate our, and the wider volcanological community’s use of Google Earth. ”

Other Google Tech Talks are here.


Published in: on June 13, 2008 at 5:57 pm  Leave a Comment  

Google Earth Layers

The Google Earth Gallery links you to a number geoscience-related Google Earth layers. For instance, the Global Paleogeographic Views layer lets you view the changing configuration of the earth’s surface from the Late Precambrian to the present.

Public-interest groups and individuals are using Google Earth to bring a valuable geographic context to important issues. Check out the Google Earth Outreach Showcase for issues concerning climate change, disappearing forests, land use assessment and more.

Keep up-to-date with new cool Google Earth layers by reading the Google Earth Blog.

Published in: on June 13, 2008 at 5:08 pm  Leave a Comment  
Tags: